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Not Enough Said

Rep. Mahoney Claims After Consolidation Savings 15% to 20% Where We Ask?

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Radio Talk Show Host Fails to Study School Consolidation for Fayette County Study
Not Enough Said project of: Net the Truth Online
Rep. Mahoney Reading Not Enough Said? Poses Study Could Show No Savings by Admin. Consolidation?
Fayette Special: Model for Other Power Grabbing PA State Legislators to Follow
PA Rep. Tim Mahoney Proposal to House Education Cmte Shows Goal To Wrest Local Control
County-wide School District Legislation Allows Board of Commissioners Authority to Equalize District
Not Enough Said on This Issue Site per Proposal for Fayette Vo-Tech/STEM Center
Confirmation Why Herald-Standard Didn't Question Rep. About His Advisory Committee
Plan for Countywide School District Consolidation = Fayette Forward Strategic Plan
Report PA School Consolidation Cost Effectiveness
Rep. Mahoney Claims After Consolidation Savings 15% to 20% Where We Ask?
Is Rep. Tim Mahoney About to Change Structure of School Administration All on His Own?
Herald-Standard & Rep. Tim Mahoney in League to Bait & Switch Public
Candidates for School Directors On the Fence or Supportive Urged to View Wealth of Critical Studies
Herald-Standard Disappointed School Board Candidates Not All Rosey County Consolidation
Study: consolidation of school districts into larger units leads to higher dropout rate!
We Can Hear It Now Some of my Opponents Don't Want The People To Decide
We Can Hear it Now: Are You Against the People Deciding Consolidation Choice
Report PA School Boards Association Study on Consolidation 2009
Cost Savings Claimed 2 Years Before Local Study Begins Now Claim Lowered!
Bid Process? Study Weighted to Cost-Savings Due to Results for Center & Monaca Consolidations?
Does Consolidation into Large District Save Costs?
Did Merged Districts Hold True to Standard & Poor Study: Taxes May Rise in 1 District
Merged Monaca & Center School Districts Less than 2,999 Students!
First Eliminate School Property Taxes, Candidate Says, Then We'll See @ Consolidation?
Central Valley School District: Archetype for (Fayette) County-wide Consolidation?
What is the Impact of Consolidation (into larger district) on Students?
What is the Impact of Consolidation (into larger district) on Rural Community?
No Public Referendum Required for Two or More School Districts to Merge
PA Economy League Report Municipal and School District Functional Mergers & Structural Consolidation
Experts Slam Consolidation Small/Medium Size Districts into Larger One
Not Enough Said Requests Talk Show Host Read Standard & Poor Study
Legislation Designed to Enable Boards of County Commissioners Power to Place Measure on Ballot
Article: PA Legislators Push Plans for School Consolidation
Fayette School Director Candidates Take Opposing View of Countywide Consolidation Plan
Get It Spot On and Don't Cover Up When You Don't
Unified Countywide School District for "Taxation Purposes"
Uniformity in the Course of Study in the Schools of the Several Grades
Rep. Mahoney Meets With Herald Standard Editorial Board
PA Dept. of Ed. Retirees Now Education Management Group Consultants to Conduct Study
Promise Local Sub-districts in Countywide School Retain Local Identity
Book of Quotes by Not Enough Said
Links per county-wide school consolidation issue
Contact Me
Stop Uniform Curriculum County-Wide School Consolidation Power Grab
Fayette County Commissioner Candidates Responses to School Regionalization Question
Tribune-Review article per PA school consolidation legislation
Article: Region to Benefit from 2 New STEM Education Centers
Herald-Standard Article: Unity between Business and Education Needed in Fayette County
Marcellus Shale Gas Program of Interest Not an Endorsement
Radio Talk Show Host: Gas Impact Concerns Citizens Demand DEP Resolve
Votefix will be providing an update soon

We would like to see the citation for the study that officials in Harrisburg, according to PA state Rep. Tim Mahoney, say, if done right, will save 15% - 20% after consolidation.
 
Consolidation of what?
 
Administrations of six local school districts?
 
Other than the administrations of six local school districts?
 
Read the quote here.
 
School district consolidation study to begin
 
Mahoney said according to officials in Harrisburg, if the plan is executed properly, school districts could see 15 percent to 20 percent in savings after consolidation.
 
 
Please return to Not Enough Said, and join with us to emphatically say:
 
Not Enough Said!

When the legislator goes from a high of 30% on cost-savings to be had (2009 promise) to a low of 15% (without documentation citing source of those officials in Harrisburg) to admitting the study could reveal take no action and there will not be any savings, you know there's a whole lot of wiggle-room going on. 
 
That draws our attention immediately since Rep. Mahoney also claimed the Keystone Opportunity Zones (tax freedom for some for a decade) are working, they really, really are.  Even after admitting on air WMBS radio (date), he agreed KOZs are unfair, not uniform, and unconstitutional, he proceeded to vote for the piece of legislation out of Harrisburg that extended the KOZs for another 7 years.  (See Keystone Opportunity Zone Unfair Agrees State Legislator Tim Mahoney Sept. 10, 2007) (See Mahoney People's Agenda Excludes Unfair Tax Exemptions - elimination! Feb. 24, 2008)
 
 In light of that, it's extremely revealing in this article School District Consolidation Study to Begin Carla DeStefano May 13, 2011 Herald-Standard.com  when Rep. Mahoney firstly admits EMG, LLC consultants could show No savings by Administrative Consolidation.  (See Rep. Mahoney Reading Not Enough Said?  Poses Study Could Show No Savings by Admin. Savings).  Rep. Mahoney then avers "there are better ways to save money..." And then he proceeds to give a figure out of the mouths of officials from Harrisburg. (a percentage he doesn't document came from a study)
 
We know where that is headed.  Harrisburg figures and liars figure!

Rep. Tim Mahoney portrays his countywide consolidation as one that can be "partially done" with a focus on "administrative cost-savings" and cutting some current 6 superintendents of six different public school districts down to 1 superintendent for 6 '"sub"-districts.

Maybe the state legislator thinks the readers have not learned any reading comprehension skills.

Slimming 6 school districts down to one countywide school district supposes consolidation that is not "partial."

Rep. Mahoney's legislation is also for "taxation purposes."

Maybe the legislator again thinks comprehension skills of readers are at an all time low in Fayette County.

If the legislation is also for taxation purposes and there would be one superintendent and one administration for all 6 school districts, that is not a "partial merger."

Rep. Mahoney's further comments are noted below.

From at least December, 2009, when PA state Rep. Tim Mahoney re-introduced House Bill 351 regarding countywide consolidation of schools until as recently as April, 2011 before the results of the legislator's contracted study on Fayette consolidation was completed, Rep. Mahoney has continuously claimed savings would be had by scaling back half-a-dozen superintendents in area districts and decreasing the size of the administrations to one countywide system.
 
 

 

Mahoney says mergers an option for school districts

“Due to demographic trends, all of our public school districts have significantly smaller student enrollments than they did 30, 20 or even 10 years ago,” said Mahoney. “It is not an exaggeration to say that some of them have graduating classes half as big as they once were. It is time for everyone — administrators, school boards, parents and especially taxpayers — to examine all alternatives to running a more streamlined and cost-effective education system.”

Mahoney said he wants to remind people across Pennsylvania that their school districts can voluntarily choose to consolidate on many levels, from full-scale mergers like Monaca-Center to the administration-only merger that he is advocating for Fayette County.

“A partial merger, such as one that focuses only on administrative functions, would allow school districts to maintain their individual identities and athletic teams, while saving money,” said Mahoney. “It is my hope that the current administration’s proposed cuts in basic education funding may serve as a catalyst to jump-start some of these discussions.”

Mahoney said that merging operations on some level may be the only way school districts can avoid imposing even more of a real estate tax burden on residents.

http://www.heraldstandard.com/news/local_news/mahoney-says-mergers-an-option-for-school-districts/article_01c8a203-472b-5b8f-bad7-603ca757f617.html

Rep. Mahoney
 

“Due to demographic trends, all of our public school districts have significantly smaller student enrollments than they did 30, 20 or even 10 years ago,” said Mahoney. “It is not an exaggeration to say that some of them have graduating classes half as big as they once were. It is time for everyone — administrators, school boards, parents and especially taxpayers — to examine all alternatives to running a more streamlined and cost-effective education system.”

http://www.heraldstandard.com/news/local_news/mahoney-says-mergers-an-option-for-school-districts/article_01c8a203-472b-5b8f-bad7-603ca757f617.html

Not Enough Said:

Rep. Mahoney has obviously not read the Standard and Poor Study on the Cost-Effectiveness of Consolidating Pennsylvania School Districts which we cite numerous times on these pages.
 
The study was completed in June, 2007.
 
It is clear on the analysis that larger school districts of over 3,000 students are not cost-effective and other costs rise when larger districts are created out of "smaller" and "medium" sized districts.
 
The study and other material from other sources highlighting yet other studies specifically note "transportation" costs rise in larger merged school districts.
 
Especially, if there are local school closings, which Rep. Mahoney has already admitted publicly on WMBS 590 are a consideration in the countywide consolidation, such closings give rise to new costs.  These costs in turn defeat the purposes of formally merging into a larger district.

Rep. Tim Mahoney
 

Mahoney said that merging operations on some level may be the only way school districts can avoid imposing even more of a real estate tax burden on residents.

http://www.heraldstandard.com/news/local_news/mahoney-says-mergers-an-option-for-school-districts/article_01c8a203-472b-5b8f-bad7-603ca757f617.html

Not Enough Said:

Rep. Mahoney's remark here is laughable to say the least.
Not Enough Said:
 
We'll pull other quotes from several researchers, but we highlight this one and have said much the same about the salaries of teachers in a countywide consolidated district going down, down, and down, we have a unicorn in our garden - would you like to see it?
 
Does anyone believe that salaries will be standardized at any level lower than the highest prevailing in the county? (Guest Op-Ed:  School District Consolidation is a Red Herring by Nathan A. Benefield and Fred D. Baldwin 03/03/2009)
(reproduced here: Experts Slam Consolidation Small/Medium Size Districts into Larger One http://dirtline.tripod.com/notenoughsaid/id18.html
 
In the countywide consolidated school district, the larger district creates increased costs.  Material presented by researchers also indicates there would not be much savings with  smaller "rural" districts combining into a larger school district.
 
Guest Op-Ed:  School District Consolidation is a Red Herring by Nathan A. Benefield and Fred D. Baldwin 03/03/2009
While measures such as bulk purchasing and cross-district health trusts are sensible cost-savings measures, these can already occur without consolidation.

It's possible that some administrative savings might materialize, but it won't help that some superintendents will become "assistant superintendents" and others will expect large raises.

The notion that larger districts have fewer administrators per pupil runs counter to experience.

The single largest school cost item (about half of every district's budget) is teacher salaries and benefits.

These would become standardized over the newly merged districts. Does anyone believe that salaries will be standardized at any level lower than the highest prevailing in the county?

 
(Guest Op-Ed:  School District Consolidation is a Red Herring by Nathan A. Benefield and Fred D. Baldwin 03/03/2009)
(reproduced here: Experts Slam Consolidation Small/Medium Size Districts into Larger One http://dirtline.tripod.com/notenoughsaid/id18.html
 
 

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Not Enough Said got a start in early May  2011

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